[I’ve been asked about this, so I’ll clarify: The Notice die and the Wild Die are each checked separately to see if they got 4 or more. You don’t add them up! Think of it this way: You’ll succeed either because you’re good at what you’re doing, or because you’re the hero of the story. Two different ways, and not cumulative.]


Yes, well, you might say that Raffaela shouldn’t be aware that her player “rolled Notice”, but here’s the thing – Lily likes to win. Ohhh, she likes to win so much.

In role playing games, you can’t “win” in the traditional sense, but there are still several ways to “get ahead” in a clear and obvious way. For example, in a mystery game, gaining more information feels better than failing to get information. Lily simply can’t (and won’t) ignore the fact she was given a chance to learn more. That means there’s something more to learn! I MUST HAVE IT

Lily’s not going to let this one go. In this week’s post on Thursday I’ll expand a bit more on the Player-Character Knowledge Gap, and how Nadav is deliberately using it to instill a certain atmosphere in his players. He knows his wife very well.

You might have noticed (hehe) that Mac’s Notice, d8, is actually better than Raffaella’s, d6. But he didn’t get to roll, because he’s not a Bogovian. There’s something around here only a Bogovian might notice as important. I find these little touches – making only certain characters roll for certain culturally-significant things – helps a lot with the immersion, making the players feel as if the fictional world is more plausible.

For more info on the “behind the scenes” of the making of today’s page, and why dice don’t deserve a panel of their own ( sad! 🙁 ) check out our subreddit.


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